Difference between DOMContentLoaded and load events – Dev

The best answers to the question “Difference between DOMContentLoaded and load events” in the category Dev.

QUESTION:

What is the difference between DOMContentLoaded and load events?

ANSWER:

The DOMContentLoaded event will fire as soon as the DOM hierarchy has been fully constructed, the load event will do it when all the images and sub-frames have finished loading.

DOMContentLoaded will work on most modern browsers, but not on IE including IE9 and above. There are some workarounds to mimic this event on older versions of IE, like the used on the jQuery library, they attach the IE specific onreadystatechange event.

ANSWER:

From the Mozilla Developer Center:

The DOMContentLoaded event is fired when the document has been
completely loaded and parsed, without waiting for stylesheets, images,
and subframes to finish loading (the load event can be used to detect
a fully-loaded page).

ANSWER:

DOMContentLoaded==window.onDomReady()

Load==window.onLoad()

A page can’t be manipulated safely until the document is “ready.” jQuery detects this state of readiness for you. Code included inside $(document).ready() will only run once the page Document Object Model (DOM) is ready for JavaScript code to execute. Code included inside $(window).load(function() { ... }) will run once the entire page (images or iframes), not just the DOM, is ready.

See: Using JQuery Core’s document-ready documentation.

ANSWER:

See the difference yourself:

DEMO

From Microsoft IE

The DOMContentLoaded event fires when parsing of the current page is complete; the load event fires when all files have finished loading from all resources, including ads and images. DOMContentLoaded is a great event to use to hookup UI functionality to complex web pages.

From Mozilla Developer Network

The DOMContentLoaded event is fired when the document has been completely loaded and parsed, without waiting for stylesheets, images, and subframes to finish loading (the load event can be used to detect a fully-loaded page).