git undo all uncommitted or unsaved changes – Dev

The best answers to the question “git undo all uncommitted or unsaved changes” in the category Dev.

QUESTION:

I’m trying to undo all changes since my last commit. I tried git reset --hard and git reset --hard HEAD after viewing this post. I responds with head is now at 18c3773… but when I look at my local source all the files are still there. What am I missing?

ANSWER:

If you wish to “undo” all uncommitted changes simply run:

git stash
git stash drop

If you have any untracked files (check by running git status), these may be removed by running:

git clean -fdx

git stash creates a new stash which will become [email protected]{0}. If you wish to check first you can run git stash list to see a list of your stashes. It will look something like:

[email protected]{0}: WIP on rails-4: 66c8407 remove forem residuals
[email protected]{1}: WIP on master: 2b8f269 Map qualifications
[email protected]{2}: WIP on master: 27a7e54 Use non-dynamic finders
[email protected]{3}: WIP on blogit: c9bd270 some changes

Each stash is named after the previous commit messsage.

ANSWER:

  • This will unstage all files you might have staged with git add:

    git reset
    
  • This will revert all local uncommitted changes (should be executed in repo root):

    git checkout .
    

    You can also revert uncommitted changes only to particular file or directory:

    git checkout [some_dir|file.txt]
    

    Yet another way to revert all uncommitted changes (longer to type, but works from any subdirectory):

    git reset --hard HEAD
    
  • This will remove all local untracked files, so only git tracked files remain:

    git clean -fdx
    

    WARNING: -x will also remove all ignored files, including ones specified by .gitignore! You may want to use -n for preview of files to be deleted.


To sum it up: executing commands below is basically equivalent to fresh git clone from original source (but it does not re-download anything, so is much faster):

git reset
git checkout .
git clean -fdx

Typical usage for this would be in build scripts, when you must make sure that your tree is absolutely clean – does not have any modifications or locally created object files or build artefacts, and you want to make it work very fast and to not re-clone whole repository every single time.

ANSWER:

there is also git stash – which “stashes” your local changes and can be reapplied at a later time or dropped if is no longer required

more info on stashing

ANSWER:

What I do is

git add . (adding everything)
git stash 
git stash drop

One liner: git add . && git stash && git stash drop

A shorter version as pointed out by M. Justin

git stash -u && git stash drop