How to post JSON to a server using C#? – Dev

The best answers to the question “How to post JSON to a server using C#?” in the category Dev.

QUESTION:

Here’s the code I’m using:

// create a request
HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)
WebRequest.Create(url); request.KeepAlive = false;
request.ProtocolVersion = HttpVersion.Version10;
request.Method = "POST";


// turn our request string into a byte stream
byte[] postBytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(json);

// this is important - make sure you specify type this way
request.ContentType = "application/json; charset=UTF-8";
request.Accept = "application/json";
request.ContentLength = postBytes.Length;
request.CookieContainer = Cookies;
request.UserAgent = currentUserAgent;
Stream requestStream = request.GetRequestStream();

// now send it
requestStream.Write(postBytes, 0, postBytes.Length);
requestStream.Close();

// grab te response and print it out to the console along with the status code
HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
string result;
using (StreamReader rdr = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
{
    result = rdr.ReadToEnd();
}

return result;

When I’m running this, I’m always getting 500 internal server error.

What am I doing wrong?

ANSWER:

Ademar’s solution can be improved by leveraging JavaScriptSerializer‘s Serialize method to provide implicit conversion of the object to JSON.

Additionally, it is possible to leverage the using statement’s default functionality in order to omit explicitly calling Flush and Close.

var httpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
httpWebRequest.ContentType = "application/json";
httpWebRequest.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(httpWebRequest.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(new
                {
                    user = "Foo",
                    password = "Baz"
                });

    streamWriter.Write(json);
}

var httpResponse = (HttpWebResponse)httpWebRequest.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(httpResponse.GetResponseStream()))
{
    var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}

ANSWER:

The way I do it and is working is:

var httpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
httpWebRequest.ContentType = "application/json";
httpWebRequest.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(httpWebRequest.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = "{\"user\":\"test\"," +
                  "\"password\":\"bla\"}";

    streamWriter.Write(json);
}

var httpResponse = (HttpWebResponse)httpWebRequest.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(httpResponse.GetResponseStream()))
{
    var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}

I wrote a library to perform this task in a simpler way, it is here: https://github.com/ademargomes/JsonRequest

Hope it helps.

ANSWER:

Further to Sean’s post, it isn’t necessary to nest the using statements. By using the StreamWriter it will be flushed and closed at the end of the block so no need to explicitly call the Flush() and Close() methods:

var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://url");
request.ContentType = "application/json";
request.Method = "POST";

using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(request.GetRequestStream()))
{
    string json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(new
                {
                    user = "Foo",
                    password = "Baz"
                });

    streamWriter.Write(json);
}

var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
{
        var result = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
}

ANSWER:

The HttpClient type is a newer implementation than the WebClient and HttpWebRequest.

You can simply use the following lines.

string myJson = "{'Username': 'myusername','Password':'pass'}";
using (var client = new HttpClient())
{
    var response = await client.PostAsync(
        "http://yourUrl", 
         new StringContent(myJson, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json"));
}

When you need your HttpClient more than once it’s recommended to only create one instance and reuse it or use the new HttpClientFactory.